Literary Criticism

Understanding To Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Claudia Durst Johnson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 225

View: 833

Collects documents and commentary illuminating Southern life in the 1950s
Literary Criticism

Reading Harper Lee: Understanding To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman

Author: Claudia Durst Johnson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 183

View: 271

The first book-length study of Harper Lee's two novels, this is the ultimate reference for those interested in Harper Lee's writing, most notably as it considers race, class, and gender. • Assists students as they strive to better understand complex issues of race, class, and gender that remain relevant topics of discussion • Provides a needed and updated student guide on Harper Lee's writing • Assesses Lee's iconic characters and helps readers to comprehend the controversy surrounding the character flaws of Atticus Finch • Offers a personal perspective written by a friend of Harper Lee
Criticism

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Harper Lee

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Criticism

Page: 109

View: 868

Discusses the writing of To kill a mockingbird by Harper Lee. Includes critical essays on the work and a brief biography of the author.

Understanding to Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Catherine Bernard

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 112

View: 932

An introduction to Harper Lee's famous novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird," discussing the author's life, the historical context of the novel, its plot, themes, characters, literary criticism, and pertinence for today's audiences.
Literary Criticism

New Interpretations of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman

Author: Amy Mohr

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 210

View: 815

Featuring essays from an international group of scholars, this volume addresses Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird (1960), the American literary classic, and her controversial Go Set a Watchman (2015). The contributions include productive new interpretations from diverse critical angles, including US literary and cultural history, Southern studies, sociological theory, gender studies, stylistic analysis, translation, and pedagogy. With a balance of critical analysis and pedagogical approaches, this provocative book will prove to be of particular interest to scholars seeking to reconcile the points of divergence in these two works. For educators at the secondary and university levels, the collection also offers current resources and perspectives on Lee’s novels.
Literary Criticism

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Michael J. Meyer

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 290

View: 638

In 1960, To Kill a Mockingbird was published to critical acclaim. To commemorate To Kill a Mockingbird's 50th anniversary, Michael J. Meyer has assembled a collection of new essays that celebrate this enduring work of American literature. These essays approach the novel from educational, legal, social, and thematic perspectives. Harper Lee's only novel won the Pulitzer Prize and was transformed into a beloved film starring Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch. An American classic that frequently appears in middle school and high school curriculums, the novel has been subjected to criticism for its subject matter and language. Still relevant and meaningful, To Kill a Mockingbird has nonetheless been under-appreciated by many critics. There are few books that address Lee's novel's contribution to the American canon and still fewer that offer insights that can be used by teachers and by students. These essays suggest that author Harper Lee deserves more credit for skillfully shaping a masterpiece that not only addresses the problems of the 1930s but also helps its readers see the problems and prejudices the world faces today. Intended for high school and undergraduate usage, as well as for teachers planning to use To Kill a Mockingbird in their classrooms, this collection will be a valuable resource for all teachers of American literature.
Literary Criticism

CliffsNotes on Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Tamara Castleman

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 114

View: 305

The original CliffsNotes study guides offer expert commentary on major themes, plots, characters, literary devices, and historical background. The latest generation of titles in this series also feature glossaries and visual elements that complement the classic, familiar format. In CliffsNotes on To Kill a Mockingbird, you explore Harper Lee's literary masterpiece—a novel that deals with Civil Rights and racial bigotry in the segregated southern United States of the 1930s. Told through the eyes of the memorable Scout Finch, the novel tells the story of her father, Atticus, as he hopelessly strives to prove the innocence of a black man accused of raping and beating a white woman. Chapter summaries and commentaries take you through Scout's coming of age journey. Critical essays give you insight into racial relations in the South during the 1930s, as well as a comparison between the novel and its landmark film version. Other features that help you study include Character analyses of the main characters A character map that graphically illustrates the relationships among the characters A section on the life and background of Harper Lee A review section that tests your knowledge A Resource Center full of books, articles, films, and Internet sites Classic literature or modern-day treasure—you'll understand it all with expert information and insight from CliffsNotes study guides.
Fathers and daughters in literature

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Mei Chin

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Fathers and daughters in literature

Page: 99

View: 754

Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning story of a black man on trial for rape in the 1930s Alabama is one of the most poignant works on the destructive effects of racism.
Literary Criticism

Racial Inequality in the American Novel “To Kill A Mockingbird” By Harper Lee

Author: NICOLETA OSACIUC

Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page:

View: 170

To Kill a Mockingbird: a beautiful and, at the same time, an ambiguous title. Jugging only by the title of the book it would be difficult to guess that the novel speaks about an alleged accusation of black and white rape, intent of lynching, and an execution. The symbolism of the title is strongly associated with the alleged African-American rape because as it would be a sin to kill a mockingbird, which does not do anything else except make music for us to enjoy, in the same manner, it would be a sin to kill Tom, who does not do anything wrong except try to help a white woman. Beyond the shadow of a doubt To Kill a Mockingbird is a much more complex novel and could be examined from a multitude of perspectives on the grounds that the novel encompasses a great variety of themes and motifs. For instance, the novel could be analyzed from a feminist point of view, given that the women in To Kill a Mockingbird were not allowed to express their own opinions and were expected to behave accordingly to the rules of southern society. The purpose of this paper, entitled Racial Inequality in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, is to examine the means by which the white community exercised their supremacy over the African-American population and to have a better understanding of the past realities depicted in the novel. We hope to achieve our goal by making use of both cultural as well as literary studies. The paper is structured in two parts: Introduction and To Kill a Mockingbird. The first part extends from chapter 1 to chapter 3 and the second part extends from chapter 2 to chapter 5. In the first part, we will begin by exemplifying a few autobiographical elements which are believed to have had an important role in the creation of the novel. Subsequently, we will include a historical background of the events related to the novel in order to broaden our understanding of To Kill a Mockingbird.