The Psychoneuroses and Their Treatment by Psychotherapy;

Author: J. Dejerine

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 416

View: 233

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
Psychology

The Evolution Of Psychotherapy

Author: Jeffrey K. Zeig

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 378

View: 545

A collection of papers from the third Evolution of Psychotherapy Conference. The Evolution Conferences are organized by The Milton H. Erickson Foundation. The Erickson Foundation is a nonprofit educational organization. First published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Psychology

Two Cases from Jung’s Clinical Practice

Author: Vicente L. de Moura

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 192

View: 492

Two Cases from Jung’s Clinical Practice places two key cases, those of Mischa Epper and Maggy Reichstein, into the context of Jung’s work in the 1920s and provides a complete assessment of their place within his writings. Presented in three parts, it first examines Jung’s disappointment with contemporary treatments and theories and his break from Freud and the development of his own ideas, and then summarises the history of his more famous patients. In Part 2, de Moura examines Epper’s case, which is recognised as an essential part of the development of the concept of active imagination, as well as how it is connected to the work of Jung’s collaborator Maria Moltzer. Finally, Part 3 assesses the case of Reichstein, which emerges as a key contribution to Jung’s writings on Eastern and Western psychology, transference and countertransference, mandalas and, in particular, synchronicity. Two Cases from Jung’s Clinical Practice provides a comprehensive and personable picture of Jung and his interactions with these two patients, giving us valuable data about a time when his practice was still evolving. A unique and insightful study, this book will be an essential work for academics and students of Jungian and post-Jungian theory, analytical psychology, and the history of psychoanalysis and psychology. These cases will also be of great interest to analytical psychologists and Jungian analysts in practice and in training.
Medical

The Transformation of the Psyche in British Primary Care, 1870-1970

Author: Rhodri Hayward

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 256

View: 798

Conflicting models of selfhood have become central to debates over modern medicine. Yet we still lack a clear historical account of how this psychological sensibility came to be established. The Transformation of the Psyche in British Primary Care, 1880-1970 will remedy this situation by demonstrating that there is nothing inevitable about the current connection between health, identity and personal history. It traces the changing conception of the psyche in Britain over the last two centuries and it demonstrates how these changes were rooted in transformed patterns of medical care. The shifts from private medicine through to National Insurance and the National Health Service fostered different kinds of relationship between doctor and patient and different understandings of psychological distress. The Transformation of the Psyche in British Primary Care, 1880-1970 examines these transformations and, in so doing, provides new critical insights into our modern sense of identity and changing notions of health that will be of great value to anyone interested in the modern history of British medicine.
Medical

Care of the Psyche

Author: Stanley W. Jackson

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 504

View: 993

In this book, a distinguished historian of medicine surveys the basic elements that have constituted psychological healing over the centuries. Dr. Stanley W. Jackson shows that healing practices, whether they come from the worlds of medicine, religion, or philosophy, share certain elements that transcend space and time.Drawing on medical writings from classical Greece and Rome to the present, as well as on philosophical and religious writings, Dr. Jackson shows that the basic ingredients of psychological healing-which have survived changes of name, the fall of their theoretical contexts, and the waning of social support in different historical eras-are essential factors in our modern psychotherapies and in healing contexts in general.
Biography & Autobiography

Jelliffe

Author: John Burnham

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 324

View: 873

Smith Ely Jelliffe (1866-1945) was a distinguished American physician who became one of the first psychoanalysts in the world. This book, an account of his life and times, also includes his unpublished and hiterto unknown correspondence with Sigmund Freud and C. G. Jung, a correspondence of nearly thirty years which continued long after the historic break between Freud and Jung. John Burnham, a well-known historian of medicine and psychoanalysis, and William McGuire, the executive editor of Jung's collected works, have based this book on the recently discovered Jelliffe papers, an important collection once believed to have been lost in a fire. Jelliffe's colorful and versatile career led him from botany and neurology (he was coauthor of a neurology text that remained standard for some forty years) to psychiatry, psychoanalysis (of which he was a founding father in the United States), and psychosomatic medicine (in which he also pioneered). Jelliffe also made outstanding contributions to medical journalism. With William Alanson White he founded the Psychoanalytic Review, and his work as editor of the Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease from 1902 to 1944 may have set a record for editorial longevity. Jelliffe was a charismatic speaker and teacher who in all his roles induced physicians and other thinkers to explore new ideas and ways of thinking. Jelliffe's correspondence with Jung and Freud illuminates the personal and professional lives of the three men. The letters help to clarify concepts in both the Jungian and Freudian schools. The shifting emphasis of Jelliffe's relationships with the two masters of psychoanalysis—first when the two were colleagues, then for the greater span of time when they were rivals and adversaries—is revealing of Jenlliffe's own flexible views. Jelliffe, furthermore, provides insights into the history of medicine and medical institutions and customs through Jelliffe's frank accounts of the developing medical profession in America. Jelliffe describes, for example, what it was like for a young M.D. to set up an economically viable practice in the 1890s. In addition, Burnham explores the problem of measuring the influence of a man like Jelliffe upon the history of ideas and institutions.