Sports & Recreation

The Martial Way and Its Virtues

Author: F. J. Chu

Publisher: Ymaa Publications

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 128

View: 359

The Martial Way is nothing less than self-cultivation and the promotion of virtuous conduct.
Sports & Recreation

Black Belt Mom

Author: Nancy Knutson

Publisher: Wheatmark, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 118

View: 422

Have you dreamed of getting a black belt? Maybe you've already become involved with martial arts. You've joined your children or your partner in this endeavor and wonder where it's going to lead. What will it require of you as a parent? What should you ask of your family? And how will this undertaking change you all? In "Black Belt Mom," Nancy Knutson chronicles the journey she took with her two children in tae kwon do. She describes the different challenges that arose at each stage, and how meeting those challenges affected the way they dealt with other areas of their lives. Her positive and enthusiastic approach makes her an effective cheerleader for families who need inspiration as they manage their own obstacles. Insightful, practical, and often amusing, "Black Belt Mom" is sure to encourage you on your path to black belt and beyond.
Sports & Recreation

Martial Virtues

Author: Charles Hackney

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 224

View: 794

This martial arts books explores the role of martial philosophy and history in personal character development. Martial Virtues explores the role of martial arts in character development. It focuses on the spiritual aspects of martial arts training, attempting to answer the question of what it means to be a good warrior. In this ground-breaking analysis, Charles Hackney draws from the psychological literature on the development of positive character traits, and from the lives and experiences of admirable warriors of fact and fiction. He analyzes how the virtues of ancient and modern warriors can be developed by practicing the martial arts. Using examples from the ancient Greeks to the samurai practitioners of bushido, from Confucius to Bruce Lee, Martial Virtues explores such qualities as courage, wisdom, justice and benevolence in turn, employing the lessons of modern psychology to understand how these virtues can be cultivated within ourselves and others. You will learn what Bruce Lee and Sun Tzu have to say about wisdom, what Miyamoto Musashi has to say about audacity and courage, and what Yagyu Munenori has to say about justice. You will also learn the stories of many of history and literature's greatest warriors including: Aeneas and Hector of Troy; William the Marshal, called the greatest knight who ever lived; Kuo Chieh, the Chinese Robin Hood; the famous Shaolin master Tid Kiu Sam; the 300 Spartans that turned aside a Persian Army at Thermopylae; the 47 Ronin of Japan who revenged the unjust punishment of their master; Korean General Kim Yu-shin, and Toshitsugu Takamatsu, 33rd Grandmaster of Togakure Ryu Ninjutsu.
Sports & Recreation

Teaching and Learning Japanese Martial Arts: Scholarly Perspectives, Vol. 2

Author: Michael DeMarco

Publisher: Via Media Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 152

View: 475

In contrast to the overabundance of writings about martial arts that are often promotional and misinformative, there are rare works by scholars that are praiseworthy for their sincere, unbiased approach to writing. This is the very definition of “scholarly.” This two-volume anthology brings together the best scholarly works published in the Journal of Asian Martial Arts on the topic of teaching and learning Japanese martial arts. In this second volume, you’ll find eight chapters that dive deep into Japanese martial traditions, combining aspects of history and culture that explain how teaching methods developed and evolved. Chapter one asks: What defines and gives meaning to the practice of karate? The Dr. Wingate looks to the ideology of karate as presented in the writings of founder Ginchin Funakoshi and traditional Japanese martial arts as “ways” of self-cultivation. This ideology is often greatly different from the ideology held by modern practitioners. This chapter explores the differences. Next, Dr. Donohue comments on the ideological complex surrounding training in the Japanese martial traditions. These systems, while remaining relatively uniform through time, have, in fact, been subject to considerable philosophical interpretation and emphasis. Why many practice martial artists has little to do with the essential nature of these arts. Dr. Grossman presents a thesis in his chapter that we can arrive at a deeper understanding of any martial arts—using aikido as an example—if we consider it to be a symbolic form of communication, as well as a martial art, and utilize the science of semiotics to translate the “message” encoded in the “body language” of aikido techniques. A photographic technical section illustrates this process. The next chapter by Sakuyama Yoshinaga discusses the potential growth for learning in children. How can adults provide the best learning environment? The author believes that inspiration comes through subtle emotions of the human heart, influencing others. The theory is found in ancient samurai traditions and applied by the author in teaching Shorinji Kempo. Chapter five by Dr. Dykhuizen point out how Asian martial arts are being practiced in cultures other than those within which they originated. Specific information concerning how practitioners from different cultures understand them becomes increasingly useful to martial artists and martial arts scholars. This chapter summarizes findings of an investigation among aikido practitioners. The Japanese Imperial family is said to have been given three symbols of authority by the gods: a mirror, a jewel, and a sword. Dr. Donohue uses this symbolic structure to discuss varying perspectives on the Japanese martial arts. Each aid in our understanding and appreciation of the multifaceted dimensions of the martial arts. In his chapter, Dr. Edinborough examines how Japanese martial arts, specifically the approach developed by Inaba Minoru, can be functionally understood as a form of art. Through referring to the aesthetic theories, the article examines budo as a means of organizing experience, recognizable alongside painting, dance, theater, and literature. The final chapter by Marvin Labbate looks close at the training hall. Dressed in a uniform, students line up in a ready position, come to attention, sit, meditate, and bow. This ritualized pattern is performed at the beginning, during, and at the end of each class, but what does it mean? In this chapter, each element of the ritualized pattern will be discussed to provide a clear understanding of its original intent. If you are interested in Japanese martial traditions, you will find much in these eight chapters that clarify why the arts are taught according to a longstanding tradition—and also why there have been evolutionary changes in the instructional methods. There is sound logic for the old traditions, as well as for the changes. The scholarly research presented in this anthology will improve a teacher’s way of instructing and help a student understand what to expect out of his or her studies.
Sports & Recreation

Modern Hand to Hand Combat

Author: Hakim Isler

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 128

View: 950

Learn the most effective way to neutralize an opponent using ancient samurai techniques applied to modern combat with this illustrated martial arts guide. Modern Hand to Hand Combat: Ancient Samurai Techniques on the Battlefield and in the Street recognizes the lawless nature of today's battlefield. Hakim Isler, a veteran of the Iraq War, knows from his own experiences that in an urban combat setting, the players, the equipment, and the stakes are very different from those found in an MMA octagon, the boxing ring, or the martial arts dojo. Based primarily on samurai techniques over a millennium old, Isler's system—Battlefield Proximity Combat—is an effective answer to the unique needs of the modern warfighter and military martial artist. This martial arts training book gives step-by-step self-defense instructions on how to effectively and realistically respond to life and death hand-to-hand combat situations through movements and principles that are as valid today as they were 1000 years ago. With almost three hundred illustrations and a detailed DVD, the philosophy and instructions in Modern Hand to Hand Combat can mean the difference between life and death on the battlefield or in a street fight.
Philosophy

Japanese Philosophy

Author: James W. Heisig

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1360

View: 930

With Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook, readers of English can now access in a single volume the richness and diversity of Japanese philosophy as it has developed throughout history. Leading scholars in the field have translated selections from the writings of more than a hundred philosophical thinkers from all eras and schools of thought, many of them available in English for the first time. The Sourcebook editors have set out to represent the entire Japanese philosophical tradition—not only the broad spectrum of academic philosophy dating from the introduction of Western philosophy in the latter part of the nineteenth century, but also the philosophical ideas of major Japanese traditions of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Shinto. The philosophical significance of each tradition is laid out in an extensive overview, and each selection is accompanied by a brief biographical sketch of its author and helpful information on placing the work in its proper context. The bulk of the supporting material, which comprises nearly a quarter of the volume, is given to original interpretive essays on topics not explicitly covered in other chapters: cultural identity, samurai thought, women philosophers, aesthetics, bioethics. An introductory chapter provides a historical overview of Japanese philosophy and a discussion of the Japanese debate over defining the idea of philosophy, both of which help explain the rationale behind the design of the Sourcebook. An exhaustive glossary of technical terminology, a chronology of authors, and a thematic index are appended. Specialists will find information related to original sources and sinographs for Japanese names and terms in a comprehensive bibliography and general index. Handsomely presented and clearly organized for ease of use, Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook will be a cornerstone in Japanese studies for decades to come. It will be an essential reference for anyone interested in traditional or contemporary Japanese culture and the way it has shaped and been shaped by its great thinkers over the centuries.
Religion

Tao Te Ching / Daodejing: A Fresh Look at the Way and its Virtues

Author: Lao Tsu

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 280

View: 802

Drawing on meticulous study of multiple sources, this fresh but authoritative reading of Lao Tsu's timeless classic combines the poetry of the Tao Te Ching with a wealth of additional material: an introduction to the enigmatic Lao Tsu and his times; a discussion of the many challenges facing the translator; 81 illustrative Chinese characters/phrases, selected to highlight key themes in each chapter; separate commentary and inspirational quotes, as well as room for you to record your own impressions, section by section.
Language Arts & Disciplines

Writer's Market

Author: Kathryn S. Brogan

Publisher: Writers Digest Books

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 1192

View: 902

A guide for the freelance writer, listing pertinent information about publications and editors
Philosophy

Engaging Japanese Philosophy

Author: Thomas P. Kasulis

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 746

View: 377

Philosophy challenges our assumptions—especially when it comes to us from another culture. In exploring Japanese philosophy, a dependable guide is essential. The present volume, written by a renowned authority on the subject, offers readers a historical survey of Japanese thought that is both comprehensive and comprehensible. Adhering to the Japanese philosophical tradition of highlighting engagement over detachment, Thomas Kasulis invites us to think with, as well as about, the Japanese masters by offering ample examples, innovative analogies, thought experiments, and jargon-free explanations. He assumes little previous knowledge and addresses themes—aesthetics, ethics, the samurai code, politics, among others—not in a vacuum but within the conditions of Japan’s cultural and intellectual history. For readers new to Japanese studies, he provides a simplified guide to pronouncing Japanese and a separate discussion of the language and how its syntax, orthography, and linguistic layers can serve the philosophical purposes of a skilled writer and subtle thinker. For those familiar with the Japanese cultural tradition but less so with philosophy, Kasulis clarifies philosophical expressions and problems, Western as well as Japanese, as they arise. Half of the book’s chapters are devoted to seven major thinkers who collectively represent the full range of Japan’s historical epochs and philosophical traditions: Kūkai, Shinran, Dōgen, Ogyū Sorai, Motoori Norinaga, Nishida Kitarō, and Watsuji Tetsurō. Nuanced details and analyses enable an engaged understanding of Japanese Buddhism, Confucianism, Shintō, and modern academic philosophy. Other chapters supply social and cultural background, including brief discussions of nearly a hundred other philosophical writers. (For additional information, cross references to material in the companion volume Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook are included.) In his closing chapter Kasulis reflects on lessons from Japanese philosophy that enhance our understanding of philosophy itself. He reminds us that philosophy in its original sense means loving wisdom, not studying ideas. In that regard, a renewed appreciation of engaged knowing can play a critical role in the revitalization of philosophy in the West as well as the East.