Architecture

Territory, Identity and Spatial Planning

Author: Mark Tewdwr-Jones

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 380

View: 886

This book provides a multi-disciplinary study of territory, identity and space in a devolved UK, through the lens of spatial planning. It draws together leading internationally renowned researchers from a variety of disciplines to address the implications of devolution upon spatial planning and the rescaling of UK politics. Each contributor offers a different perspective on the core issues in planning today in the context of New Labour's regional project, particularly the government's concern with business competitiveness, and key themes are illustrated with important case studies throughout.
Architecture

Territory, Identity and Spatial Planning

Author: Mark Tewdwr-Jones

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 408

View: 363

This book provides a multi-disciplinary study of territory, identity and space in a devolved UK, through the lens of spatial planning. It draws together leading internationally renowned researchers from a variety of disciplines to address the implications of devolution upon spatial planning and the rescaling of UK politics. Each contributor offers a different perspective on the core issues in planning today in the context of New Labour’s regional project, particularly the government’s concern with business competitiveness, and key themes are illustrated with important case studies throughout.
Business & Economics

Territorial Development, Cohesion and Spatial Planning

Author: Neil Adams

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 464

View: 668

This book examines some of the evolving challenges faced by EU regional policy in light of enlargement and to assess some of the approaches and trends in terms of territorial development policy and practice that are emerging out of this process. Focusing on the experiences on Central and Eastern Europe, these chapters reflect on the diversity of approaches to spatial planning and the the politics of policy formation and multi-level governance operations – from local to trans-national agendas. Promoting increased awareness and understanding of these issues is the main purpose of the book, as well as harnessing the extensive capacity and ‘knowledge’ within these countries that can greatly enrich the discourse within an enlarged ‘epistemic community’ of European spatial planning academics, practitioners and policy-makers. The recently acquired CEE dimension provides a unique opportunity to examine the evolution of existing ‘epistemic communities’ as well as to explore the potential emergence of new ones..
Political Science

Spatial Planning and Governance

Author: Mark Tewdwr-Jones

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 296

View: 646

Planners in the UK have had continually to adjust their priorities and practices in light of changing political agendas and real-world problems. This new text, from one of the UK's leading planning voices, shows how planning has evolved, and gives a clear and critical overview of the meaning and form of spatial planning. Presenting planning as always and everywhere needing to manage the tension between people's demands and the finite resources of the land, Tewdwr-Jones examines today's challenges and the solutions that planning might offer. Particular attention is given to the pressures caused by economic uncertainty, climate change and a changing demography and to how the current emphasis on localism affects planners' ability to respond to these pressures. The book takes full account of multi-level governance in the UK and shows how the European planning agenda is implemented nationally. Combining historical analysis with contemporary examples and debate, Spatial Planning and Governance provides an original perspective on what planning has become and what it might offer in the future.
Architecture

Effective Practice in Spatial Planning

Author: Janice Morphet

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 312

View: 543

After years of being regarded as a regulatory tool, spatial planning is now a key agent in delivering better places for the future. Dealing with the role of spatial planning in major change such as urban extensions or redevelopment, this book asks how it can deliver at the local level. Setting out the new local governance within which spatial planning now operates and identifying the requirements of successful delivery, this book also provides an introduction to project management approaches to spatial planning. It details what the rules are for spatial planning, the role of evidence and public involvement in delivering the local vision and how this works as part of coherent and consistent sub-regional approach. The conclusion is a forward look at what is likely to follow the effective creation of inspiring and successful places using spatial planning as a key tool.
Political Science

European Territorial Governance

Author: W. Zonneveld

Publisher: IOS Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 593

The 1990s ended with the birth of the concept of European spatial planning, which became a unique catalyst of change in Europe and in EU member states and regions. This book examines both the evolution of territorial governance at a European and transnational level and how this new type of governance affects planning at the local and regional level. It not only brings together a number of papers written by academic scholars but also several reflective contributions by practitioners. As such, this book seeks to contribute to various theoretical and empirical discussions: the institutionalization of European policy and integration; the Europeanisation of policy and planning; multi-level and multi-actor policy making; the contested nature of the knowledge base of European territorial governance and the role of visualization in politics and planning. This volume has wide-ranging appeal for academics, practitioners and students in the field of urban and regional planning, geography and European studies.
Social Science

Place Identity, Participation and Planning

Author: Cliff Hague

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 249

View: 540

Can regional identities create a more sustainable alternative to the increasingly standardised environments in which we live? Is bottom-up rather than top-down planning possible?
Architecture

Conceptions of Space and Place in Strategic Spatial Planning

Author: Simin Davoudi

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 304

View: 265

Bringing together authors from academia and practice, this book examines spatial planning at different places throughout the British Isles. Six illustrative case studies of practice examine which conceptions of space and place have been articulated, presented and visualized through the production of spatial strategies. Ranging from a large conurbation (London) to regional (Yorkshire and Humber) and national levels, the case studies give a rounded and grounded view of the physical results and the theory behind them. While there is widespread support for re-orienting planning towards space and place, there has been little common understanding about what constitutes ‘spatial planning’, and what conceptions of space and place underpin it. This book addresses these questions and stimulates debate and critical thinking about space and place among academic and professional planners.
Science

Identity and Territorial Character

Author: Joaquín Farinós Dasí

Publisher: Universitat de València

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 184

View: 595

In economic crisis times it seems territory «does not matter»... less than never. This argument neglects, consciously or not, the possibility of new innovative ways that precisely contribute to promoting, again, development; this time supported on cooperation and territorial intelligence for both cohesion and better quality of life from local to supra-national (EU) levels. A renewed understanding of local (territorial) development is presented in this book; a new model of competitiveness based on specific resources instead common or banal ones. The goal of this volume is re-inventing territories and exploring possibilities of vectors such identity, culture and new territorial government/governance practices.
Architecture

Spatial Planning Systems and Practices in Europe

Author: Mario Reimer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 336

View: 969

Ideal for students and practitioners working in spatial planning, the Europeanization of planning agendas and regional policy in general Spatial Planning Systems and Practices in Europe develops a systematic methodological framework to analyze changes in planning systems throughout Europe. The main aim of the book is to delineate the coexistence of continuity and change and of convergence and divergence with regard to planning practices across Europe. Based on the work of experts on spatial planning from twelve European countries the authors underline the specific and context-dependent variety and disparateness of planning transformation, focusing on the main objectives of the changes, the driving forces behind them and the main phases and turning points, the main agenda setting actors, and the different planning modes and tools reflected in the different "policy and planning styles". Along with a methodological framework the book includes twelve country case studies and the comparative conclusions covering a variety of planning systems of EU member states. According to the four "ideal types" of planning systems identified in the EU Compendium, at least two countries have been selected from each of the four different planning traditions: regional-economic (France, Germany), Urbanism (Greece, Italy), comprehensive/integrated (Denmark ,Finland, Netherlands, Germany), "land use planning" (UK, Czech Republic, Belgium/Flanders), along with two additional case studies focusing on the recent developments in eastern European countries by looking at Poland and in southern Europe looking at Turkey.
Social Science

Making Strategies in Spatial Planning

Author: Maria Cerreta

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 424

View: 448

This provocative collection of essays challenges traditional ideas of strategic s- tial planning and opens up new avenues of analysis and research. The diversity of contributions here suggests that we need to rethink spatial planning in several f- reaching ways. Let me suggest several avenues of such rethinking that can have both theoretical and practical consequences. First, we need to overcome simplistic bifurcations or dichotomies of assessing outcomes and processes separately from one another. To lapse into the nostalgia of imagining that outcome analysis can exhaust strategic planners’ work might appeal to academics content to study ‘what should be’, but it will doom itself to further irrelevance, ignorance of politics, and rationalistic, technocratic fantasies. But to lapse into an optimism that ‘good process’ is all that strategic planning requires, similarly, rests upon a ction that no credible planning analyst believes: that enough talk will miraculously transcend con ict and produce agreement. Neither sing- minded approach can work, for both avoid dealing with con ict and power, and both too easily avoid dealing with the messiness and the practicalities of negotiating out con icting interests and values – and doing so in ethically and politically critical ways, far from resting content with mere ‘compromise’. Second, we must rethink the sanctity of expertise. By considering analyses of planning outcomes as inseparable from planning processes, these accounts help us to see expertise and substantive analysis as being ‘on tap’, ready to put into use, rather than being particularly and technocratically ‘on top’.
Architecture

Making European Space

Author: Ole B. Jensen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 312

View: 580

Making European Space explores how future visions of Europe's physical space are being decisively shaped by transnational politics and power struggles, which are being played out in new multi-level arenas of governance across the European Union. At stake are big ideas about mobility and friction, about relations between core and peripheral regions, and about the future Europe's cities and countryside. The book builds a critical narrative of the emergence of a new discourse of Europe as 'monotopia', revealing a very real project to shape European space in line with visions of high speed, frictionless mobility, the transgression of borders, and the creation of city networks. The narrative explores in depth how the particular ideas of mobility and space which underpin this discourse are being constructed in policy making, and reflects on the legitimacy of these policy processes. In particular, it shows how spatial ideas are becoming embedded in the everyday practices of the social and political organisation of space, in ways that make a frictionless Europe seem natural, and part of a common European territorial identity.
Social Science

The New Spatial Planning

Author: Graham Haughton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 349

Spatial planning, strongly advocated by government and the profession, is intended to be more holistic, more strategic, more inclusive, more integrative and more attuned to sustainable development than previous approaches. In what the authors refer to as the New Spatial Planning, there is a fairly rapidly evolving maturity and sophistication in how strategies are developed and produced. Crucially, the authors argue that the reworked boundaries of spatial planning means that to understand it we need to look as much outside the formal system of practices of ‘planning’ as within it. Using a rich empirical resource base, this book takes a critical look at recent practices to see whether the new spatial planning is having the kinds of impacts its advocates would wish. Contributing to theoretical debates in planning, state restructuring and governance, it also outlines and critiques the contemporary practice of spatial planning. This book will have a place on the shelves of researchers and students interested in urban/regional studies, politics and planning studies.
Business & Economics

Governing Territorial Development in the Western Balkans

Author: Erblin Berisha

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 381

View: 585

This book offers a multifaceted overview of the evolution of spatial development, governance and planning in the Western Balkans from an institutionalist perspective. Written by experts in the field, it features various regional and national studies covering topics such as regional and spatial planning, territorial development and governance, and regional and cross-border cooperation in the Western Balkans. Offering a wealth of national, regional and local insights on territorial cooperation, development and planning, this book will appeal to scholars in regional and spatial sciences and related fields alike.
Architecture

The Futures of the City Region

Author: Michael Neuman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 28

View: 503

Does the ‘city region’ constitute a new departure in urbanisation? If so, what are the key elements of that departure? The realities of the urban in the 21st century are increasingly complex and polychromatic. The rise of global networks enabled by supranational administrations, both governmental and corporate, strongly influences and structures the management of urban life. How we conceive the city region has intellectual and practical consequences. First, in helping us grasp rapidly changing realities; and second in facilitating the flow of resources, ideas and learning to enhance the quality of life of citizens. Two themes interweave through this collection, within this broad palette. First are the socio-spatial constructs and their relationship to the empirical evidence of change in the physical and functional aspects of urban form. Second is what they mean for the spatial scales of governance. This latter theme explores territorially based understandings of intervention and the changing set of political concerns in selected case studies. In efforts to address these issues and improve upon knowledge, this collection brings together international scholars building new data-driven, cross-disciplinary theories to create new images of the city region that may prove to supplement if not supplant old ones. The book illustrates the dialectical interplay of theory and fact, time and space, and spatial and institutional which expands on our intellectual grasp of the theoretical debates on ‘city-regions’ through ‘practical knowing’, citing examples from Europe, the United States, Australasia, and beyond. This book was originally published as a Special Issue of Regional Studies.
Architecture

Regional Planning

Author: John Glasson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 316

View: 940

Regional Planning provides a comprehensive introduction to the concepts and theory of regional planning in the UK. Drawing on examples from throughout the UK, it provides students and practitioners with a descriptive and analytical foundation for understanding this rapidly changing area of planning. The book includes four main sections covering: the context and history of regional planning theoretical approaches evolving practice future prospects. New questions and methods of theorizing are explored and new connections made with contemporary debates in geography, political science and planning theory. The elements of critical analysis allow both practitioners and more advanced students to reflect upon their activities in a contemporary context. Regional Planning is the essential, up-to-date text for students interested in all aspects of this increasingly influential subject.
Architecture

Planning Regional Futures

Author: John Harrison

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 336

View: 652

Planning Regional Futures is an intellectual call to engage planners to critically explore what planning is, and should be, in how cities and regions are planned. This is in a context where planning is seen to face powerful challenges – professionally, intellectually and practically – in ways arguably not seen before: planning is no longer solely the domain of professional planners but opened-up to a diverse group of actors; the link between the study of cities and regions, which traditionally had a disciplinary home in planning schools and the like, steadily eroded as research increasingly takes place in interdisciplinary research institutes; the advent of real-time modelling posing fundamental challenges for the type of long-term perspective that planning has traditionally afforded; ‘regional planning’ and its mixed record of achievement; and, the link between ‘region’ and ‘planning’ becoming decoupled as alternative regional (and other spatial) approaches to planning have emerged. This book takes up the intellectual and practical challenge of planning regional futures, moving beyond the narrow confines of existing debate and providing a forum for debating what planning is, and should be, for in how we plan cities and regions. The chapters in this book were originally published as a special issue of Regional Studies.
Architecture

Devolution, Regionalism and Regional Development

Author: Jonathan Bradbury

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 240

View: 390

Devolution, Regionalism and Regional Development provides an overview and critical perspective on the impact of devolution on regionalism in the UK since 1999, taking a research-based look at issues central to the development of regionalism: politics, governance and planning. This multidisciplinary book is written by academics from the fields of geography, economics, town planning, public policy, management, public administration, politics and sociology with a final chapter by Patrick Le Gales putting the research findings into a theoretical context. This will be an important book for those researching and studying economic and political geography and planning as well as those involved in regional development.
Political Science

Spatial Planning and Climate Change

Author: Elizabeth Wilson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 480

View: 715

Spatial planning has a vital role to play in the move to a low carbon energy future and in adapting to climate change. To do this, spatial planning must develop and implement new approaches. Elizabeth Wilson and Jake Piper explore a wide range of issues in this comprehensive book on the relationship between our changing climate and spatial planning, and suggest ways of addressing the challenges by taking a longer-sighted approach to our preparation for the future. This text includes: an overview of what we know already about future climate change and its impacts, as we attempt both to adapt to these changes and to reduce the emissions which cause them the role of spatial planning in relation to climate change, offering some theoretical and political explanations for the challenges that planning faces in the coming decades a review of policy and legislation at international, EU and UK levels in regard to climate change, and the support this gives to the planning system case studies detailing what responses the UK and the Netherlands have made so far in light of the evidence ways to help new and existing urban developments to reduce energy use and to adapt to climate change, through strengthening the relationships between urban and rural areas to avoid water shortage, floods or loss of biodiversity. The authors take an evidence-based look at this hugely important topic, providing a well-illustrated text for spatial planning professionals, politicians and the interested public, as well as a useful reference for postgraduate planning, geography, urban studies, urban design and environmental studies students.