Social Science

Reinscribing Moses

Author: Bluma Goldstein

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 218

View: 127

Examines problems of German-Jewish and Austrian-Jewish identity through analysis of the figure of Moses in the works of Heine, Kafka, Freud, and Schoenberg. Discusses the view of Moses as the liberator of oppressed Jewry on the background of antisemitism in 19th-20th century Europe. See especially pp. 69-77, "Freud and Antisemitism".
Religion

Moses the Egyptian

Author: Jan Assmann

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 288

View: 188

Music

Political and Religious Ideas in the Works of Arnold Schoenberg

Author: Charlotte M. Cross

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 336

View: 652

The original essays in this collection chronicle the transformation of Arnold Schoenberg's works from music as pure art to music as a vehicle of religious and political ideas, during the first half of the twentieth century. This interdisciplinary volume includes contributions from musicologists, music theorists, and scholars of German literature and of Jewish studies.
Literary Criticism

Uses and Abuses of Moses

Author: Theodore Ziolkowski

Publisher: University of Notre Dame Pess

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 364

View: 419

In Uses and Abuses of Moses, Theodore Ziolkowski surveys the major literary treatments of the biblical figure of Moses since the Enlightenment. Beginning with the influential treatments by Schiller and Goethe, for whom Moses was, respectively, a member of a mystery cult and a violent murderer, Ziolkowski examines an impressive array of dramas, poems, operas, novels, and films to show the many ways in which the charismatic figure of Moses has been exploited—the “uses and abuses” of the title—to serve a variety of ideological and cultural purposes. Ziolkowski’s wide-ranging and in-depth study compares and analyzes the attempts by nearly one hundred writers to fill in the gaps in the biblical account of Moses’ life and to explain his motivation as a leader, lawgiver, and prophet. As Ziolkowski richly demonstrates, Moses’ image has been affected by historical factors such as the Egyptomania of the 1820s, the revolutionary movements of the mid-nineteenth century, the early move toward black liberation in the United States, and critical biblical scholarship of the late nineteenth century before, in the twentieth century, being appropriated by Marxists, Socialists, Nazis, and Freudians. The majority of the works studied are by Austro-German and Anglo-American writers, but Ziolkowski also includes significant examples of works from Hungary, Sweden, Norway, the Ukraine, Denmark, the Netherlands, Italy, and France. The figure of Moses becomes an animate seismograph, in Ziolkowski’s words, through whose literary reception we can trace many of the shifts in the cultural landscape of the past two centuries.
Religion

Rewriting Moses

Author: Brian Britt

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 997

Exalted for centuries as a hero and author of the Bible, Moses is inseparable from biblical tradition itself. Moses is also an inherently ambiguous figure and a perennial focus of controversy, from ancient disputes of priestly rivalry to modern issues of class, gender and race. In Rewriting Moses, Brian Britt analyses elements of polemic and ideology in the Moses of the Bible, of film, novel, visual art and scholarship. He argues that the biblical Moses lives within writing, while the post-biblical Moses lives more often in biography. Yet later rewritings of Moses refract biblical traditions of writing in surprising ways. Rewriting Moses provides an original account of the Freudian insight that traditions preserve what they repress. This is volume 14 in the Gender, Cutlure, Theory series and is volume 402 in the Journal for the Study of the Old Testament Supplements series.
Literary Criticism

Moses and Multiculturalism

Author: Barbara Johnson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 112

View: 373

Countering impressions of Moses reinforced by Sigmund Freud in his epoch-making Moses and Monotheism, this concise, engaging work begins with the perception that the story of Moses is at once the most nationalist and the most multicultural of all foundation narratives. Weaving together various texts—biblical passages, philosophy, poems, novels, opera, and movies—Barbara Johnson explores how the story of Moses has been appropriated, reimagined, and transmitted across cultures and historical moments. But she finds that already in the Bible, the story of Moses is a multicultural story, the story of someone who functions well in a world to which he, unbeknownst to the casual observer, does not belong. Using the Moses story as a lens through which to view questions at the heart of contemporary literary, philosophical, and ethical debates, Johnson shows how, through a close analysis of this figure's recurrence through time, we might understand something of the paradoxes, if not the impasses of contemporary multiculturalism.
Religion

Moses in America

Author: Melanie Jane Wright

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 172

View: 540

This book explores the retelling of the life of Moses in three 20th-century American narratives: Moses in Red, by Lincoln Steffens; Moses, Man of the Mountain, by Zora Neale Hurston; and Cecil B. DeMille's film, The Ten Commandments. Wright's analysis reveals that the figure of Moses has strong currency in American culture at many levels.
Religion

A Woman Called Moses

Author: Jean-Christophe Attias

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 155

What if there was another Moses, very different from the one we know? According to tradition, Moses wrote the first five books of the Bible. He is depicted there in a surprising way: with and against God; with and against his people; bringer of the Tablets of the Law, which he breaks; a stuttering prophet, guide to a Promised Land entry to which remains forbidden to him, and dead in an unknown tomb... Highly confusing for those who imagine a Moses carved out of a single block. By way a series of possible portraits - including one of a female Moses - Jean-Christophe Attias follows the metamorphoses of the Hebrew liberator through ages and cultures. Drawing on rabbinical sources as well as the Bible itself, he examines the words of the texts and especially their silences. He discovers here a fragile prophet, teacher of a Judaism of the spirit, of wandering, and of incompleteness. Receive and transmit. Listen, even when the message is confusing. Insistently question, especially when there is no answer. And always, remain free. This seems to be the Judaism of Moses. A Judaism that speaks to believers and others - to Jews, of course, but also far beyond them, inviting its hearers to have done with tribal pride, the violence of weapons, and the tyranny of a special place.
History

New Perspectives on Freud's Moses and Monotheism

Author: Ruth Ginsburg

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 242

"New Perspectives on Freud's Moses and Monotheism" presents some of the most important current scholarship on 'Moses and Monotheism'. The essays in this volume offer new perspectives on Freud's perception of Judaism, of collective trauma and collective repression, national violence, gender issues, hermeneutic enigmas, religious configurations, questions of representation, and constructions of truth, while exploring the relevance of 'Moses and Monotheism' in diverse fields - from Jewish Studies, Psychoanalysis, History, and Egyptology to Literature, Musicology, and Art.