Political Science

Negotiating Flexibility

Author: Medzinárodná organizácia práce

Publisher: International Labour Organization

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 157

View: 314

This timely volume discusses the extent to which the labor market is becoming more flexible in response to competitive pressures and examines the pivotal roles of collective bargaining in introducing this flexibility.Providing detailed information from 22 country studies, the book covers industrialized and developing nations across Western Europe, North and South America, and Asia. It analyzes the extent of flexibility introduced in these labor markets, as well as the changing role of the state in industrial relations, and the positions of employers and trade unions on labor market flexibility. This comprehensive study reviews the move toward flexibility in four principal areas: contracts of employment, pay, working time, and work organization.While closely examining the means of achieving greater labor market flexibility, this highly topical book addresses the various ways in which flexibility has been introduced, including through legislative action, collective bargaining, individual contracts of employment, and unilateral employer decisions. The findings in this book reveal that collective bargaining is the most effective means of introducing flexibility, as it engages both employers and workers in the process of change.In addition, the volume examines the outcomes of negotiations on flexibility at the central, sectoral, and enterprise levels, paying special attention to the trade-offs that arise, particularly in the areas of job security, working time, and workers' lifestyles.
Business & Economics

Our Own Time

Author: David R. Roediger

Publisher: Praeger

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 380

View: 624

Beginning with a picture of working hours in colonial America and the early republic, Roediger and Foner then analyze the movement for a ten-hour workday in the early nineteenth century. They demonstrate that the ten-hour issue was a key to the dynamism of the Jacksonian labor movement as well as to the unity of male artisans and female factory workers in the 1840s. The authors proceed to examine the subsequent demands for an eight-hour day, which helped to produce the mass labor struggles of the late nineteenth century and established the American Federation of Labor as the dominant force in American trade unionism. Chapters on labor movement defeats following World War I, on the depression years, and on the lack of progress over the last half-century.

Negotiating Our Way Up Collective Bargaining in a Changing World of Work

Author: OECD

Publisher: OECD Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 236

View: 748

Collective bargaining and workers’ voice are often discussed in the past rather than in the future tense, but can they play a role in the context of a rapidly changing world of work? This report provides a comprehensive assessment of the functioning of collective bargaining systems and workers’ voice arrangements across OECD countries, and new insights on their effect on labour market performance today.
History

Negotiating the New Germany

Author: Lowell Turner

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 659

'No other book that I am aware of places the German industrial relations system in the broader industrial and political context in an effort to understand the role of the industrial relations system in contributing to a nation's economic success and how that role is being affected by economic and political change.'—James P. Begin, Rutgers University The reunification of Germany in 1990 juxtaposed two very different models of industrial relations. This volume assesses the results. By the late 1980s, West Germany had developed and refined a largely collaborative relationship between business and labor, codified in law, that governed industrial relations effectively. How would East German workers, operating within a completely different system for forty years, respond to West Germany's institutional social partnership? Would western-style social partnership spread to all of the New Germany, or find itself seriously destabilized? The internationally recognized scholars who contribute to this volume are unanimous in their admiration of key elements in the German model. They diverge, however, on their assessments of the resilience of that model in the face of dramatic new challenges in the 1990s.
Business & Economics

A Short Course in International Negotiating

Author: Jeffrey E. Curry

Publisher: World Trade Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 184

View: 646

This book provides the foundation for successful international negotiations. Whether buying a suitcase of sweaters in the Andes or negotiating a joint venture factory in China that will employ 3,000 workers, this book will prove to be invaluable.
History

England Eats Out

Author: John Burnett

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 380

View: 336

Why do so many people now eat out in England? Food and the culture surrounding how we consume it are high on everyone’s agenda. England Eats Out is the ultimate book for a nation obsessed with food. Today eating out is more than just getting fed; it is an expression of lifestyle. In the past it has been crucial to survival for the impoverished but a primary form of entertainment for the few. In the past, to eat outside the home for pleasure was mainly restricted to the wealthier classes when travelling or on holiday- there were clubs and pubs for men, but women did not normally eat in public places. Eating out came to all classes, to men, women and young people after World War Two as a result of rising standards of living, the growth of leisure and the emergence of new types of restaurants having wide popular appeal. England Eats Out explores these trends from the early nineteenth century to the present. From chop-houses and railway food to haute cuisine, award winning author John Burnett takes the reader on a gastronomic tour of 170 years of eating out, covering food for princes and paupers. Beautifully illustrated, England Eats Out covers highly topical subjects such as the history of fast food; the rise of the celebrity chef and the fascinating history of teashops, coffee houses, feasts and picnics.
Business & Economics

I-deals: Idiosyncratic Deals Employees Bargain for Themselves

Author: Denise Rousseau

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 280

View: 140

Employees with valuable skills and a sense of their own worth can make their jobs, pay, perks, and career opportunities different from those of their coworkers in subtle and not-so-subtle ways. Work at home arrangements, flexible hours, special projects - personally negotiated arrangements like these can be a valuable source of flexibility and personal satisfaction, but at the risk of creating inequality and resentment by other employees. This book shows how such individual arrangements can be made fair and acceptable to coworkers, and beneficial to both the employee and the employer. Written by the world's leading expert on the subject, I-deals: Idiosyncratic Deals Employees Bargain for Themselves challenges traditional notions that standardization is the way to create workplace justice. The book is filled with real examples, cases, and supporting data. It expands conventional ideas of workplace fairness, provides details on the power that workers influence over their employment conditions, and spells out how employees and employers can channel this influence into mutually beneficial innovations. The book is "must reading" for students and scholars in the fields of human resource management and organizational behavior, and for managers and employees everywhere.