History

British Columbia Almanac

Author: Mark Forsythe

Publisher: arsenal pulp press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 213

View: 456

British Columbia is a province of extraordinary extremes: urban areas and rural territories; lush farm terrain and mountain vistas; balmy ocean views and frozen snowscapes. Its population is equally diverse: gardeners, skiiers, bush pilots, filmmakers, fishermen, and assorted eccentrics who could have only come from British Columbia. Through it all, CBC Radio 1's BC Almanac has documented BC life in all its various forms. British Columbia Almanac, written and compiled by host Mark Forsythe, provides a fun, informative, and captivating snapshot of the province and its habitues. Chapters are devoted to each season of the year in BC. For example, "Summer" will include barbecue recipes, hidden hiker trails, cougar attack tales, best roadside diners, and favourite campsites; "Winter" will include recipes for soups and stews, skiing trivia, winter survival stories, and Christmas in BC anecdotes. There will be essays by regular BC Almanac contributors such as gardener Brian Minter, historian Jean Barman, and outdoors expert Jack Christie--all of them accomplished authors in their own right--as well as personal anecdotes and photographs from the program's listeners located in all parts of the province, reporting on life in their neck of the woods. Scattered throughout are various BC trivia and facts, as well as behind-the-scenes tales of the show itself, a fixture on CBC Radio 1 since the 1980s. Two-colour throughout; includes numerous photographs and illustrations.
Travel

Lonely Planet British Columbia & the Canadian Rockies

Author: Lonely Planet

Publisher: Lonely Planet

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page:

View: 900

Lonely Planet's British Columbia & the Canadian Rockies is your most up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Spot wildlife in Jasper, stroll Stanley Park's Seawall Promenade, and ski at Whistler- all with your trusted travel companion.
History

Growing Up British in British Columbia

Author: Jean Barman

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 989

During the first half of this century, about fifty non-Canadian private boys' schools existed in British Columbia, virtually all of them founded on the principles of private education in Britain and intended to serve the offspring of British settlers. In this book Jean Barman explains the appeal of the British model of education, re-creates the ethos of private school life, and analyzes the effect of these schools on the social fabric of the province.
Architecture

Francis Rattenbury and British Columbia

Author: Anthony A. Barrett

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 405

View: 215

Yorkshire-born Francis Mawson Rattenbury (1867-1935) emigrated to British Columbia as a young architect in 1892. Within months of his arrival in Victoria he launched his brilliant, if abbreviated, career by winning an international competition to design the legislative buildings. While his life was marred by controversy, scandal and, in the end, tragedy, Rattenbury's architecture had an enduring impact on the Canadian landscape and his commercial ventures were important to the economic development of the West. Richly illustrated with over 200 drawings and photographs, Francis Rattenbury and British Columbia is the first major critical study of a Canadian architect in the context of his times. Using unpublished primary sources, including his recently discovered private letters, the authors document Rattenbury's professional career and the evolution of his architectural style. Detailed descriptions are given of some of his most famous projects, notably the legislative buildings and the Empress Hotel in Victoria. Besides working on a number of government commissions, Rattenbury became chief architect for the Canadian Pacific Railway and designed "chateau-like" buildings for C.P.R. hotels in the Rockies, Vancouver, and Victoria. Other projects such as the Vancouver and Nanaimo Courthouses and Bank of Montreal branches set the pattern for institutional architecture in British Columbia. His buildings not only drew attention to the growing importance of the province, but also lent dignity and character to its major centres. Filled with the vigour and confidence of the imperial age, Rattenbury initiated a number of commercial ventures. These included the founding of a transportation system to the Yukon goldfields and extensive land speculations. As the authors point out, these investments were perhaps not undertaken solely for monetary gain but reflected Rattenbury's firm belief in the future of British Columbia and his desire to play an active role in its growth. Unfortunately, his entrepreneurial adventures involved heavy financial losses, among which were ruinous lawsuits involving the provincial government. This pioneering work on Western Canadian architecture will serve as a valuable design source for both the specialist and lay reader. It also includes an important account of the part played by major Canadian companies and government patronage in the development of British Columbia. This professional biography reveals new facets of Rattenbury's life and character which have been the subject of both public and literary controversy.
Science

British Columbia Place Names

Author: G.P. (Philip) V. Akrigg

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 330

View: 923

Elephant Crossing. Houdini Needles. Miniskirt, Tickletoeteaser Tower, and Why Not Mountain. These are just some of the many names of places, rivers, mountains, and lakes that you will come across in the newest edition of British Columbia Place Names. This classic which, in its various editions, has sold over 29,000 copies, covers about 2,500 geographical features, cities, towns, and smaller communities in the province. The book abounds with fascinating historical facts, stories, and remarkable characters involved with the names of towns, cities, rivers, lakes, mountains, and islands. The selection was determined by the geographical importance of the feature as well as story of the naming. In the introduction the authors deal with the stages by which B.C. acquired its place names, the history of research into those names, and the categories into which they fall. The latter range from the honorific and commemorative to the comic and disrespectful. Aboriginal names receive particular attention. The location of each place is clearly indicated and the text is accompanied by detailed maps. Brief biographical accounts of persons with places named after them as well as an abundance of anecdotes make this a fascinating book for browsers and an invaluable resource for historians.
Biography & Autobiography

Made in British Columbia

Author: Maria Tippett

Publisher: Harbour Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 802

Is there such a thing as British Columbia culture, and if so, is there anything special about it? This is the broad question Dr. Maria Tippett answers in this work with an assured “yes!” To prove her point she looks at the careers of eight ground-breaking cultural producers in the fields of painting, aboriginal art, architecture, writing, theatre and music. The eight creative figures profiled in Made in British Columbia are not just distinguished artists who made an enduring mark on Canadian culture during the twentieth century. They are unique artists whose work is intimately interwoven with British Columbia’s identity. Emily Carr portrayed BC’s coastal landscape in a manner as unique as her lifestyle. Bill Reid’s carvings, jewellery and sculpture stand as a contemporary interpretation of his reclaimed Haida heritage. The name Francis Rattenbury is less known than The Empress Hotel in Victoria, one of many prominent BC buildings he designed, while Arthur Erickson’s modern architectural contributions are recognized worldwide. Martin Allerdale Grainger’s experience in the BC woods in the early days of hand-logging inspired him to write one of the undisputed classics of BC fiction, Woodsmen of the West. Jean Coulthard struggled for respect as a female composer during the 1920s and 1930s in British Columbia but eventually proved her extraordinary musical talents internationally. George Woodcock left Britain in 1949 to forge his career as an influential author, editor, mentor and tireless promoter of literary scholarship in the province, while playwright George Ryga, the son of Ukrainian immigrants, exposed the anguish and reality of life for Native women in our cities with his 1967 play, The Ecstasy of Rita Joe. Featuring images of the artists and their works, Made in British Columbia presents a history of the treasures found in our galleries, concert halls, theatres, museums, libraries and streetscapes, and explores the legacy of a cultural tradition as unique as the place that nurtured it.
Science

British Columbia Place Names

Author: G. P. V. Akrigg

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 979

Elephant Crossing, Houdini Needles, Miniskirt, Billy Whiskers Glacier.There are just a handful of the many colourful names you will come across in this newest edition of British Columbia Place Names, which has been expanded to cover some 2,400 places acros sthe province. This BC classic and its predecessor, 1001 British Columbia Place Names, together have sold over 29,000 copies. British Columbia Place Names is truly the work of a lifetime. The authors, Philip and Helen Akrigg, have spent more than forty years researching BC place names, hunting through archives in Canada, the United States, and Britain, and making extensive field trips across the entire province to interview informants and view sites. The result is a marvellous book filled with remarkable historical facts, interesting anecdotes, and brief biographical accounts of the characters for which the province’s towns, cities, rivers, lakes, mountains, and islands have become namesakes. Tickletoeteaser Tower, The Lecture Cutters, Why Not Mountain, Phyllis’s Engine. The list of intriguing names goes on. This book will be a source of fascination for browsers as well as an invaluable resource for historians. It should definately find a home on the bookshelves or in the glove compartment of anyone with an interest in BC history. Philip Akrigg was for many years professor of English at the Univeristy of British Columbia. Helen Akrigg also taught at UBC and is a past president of the British Columbia Historical Association.
Art

Light for a Cold Land

Author: Peter Larisey

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 199

View: 312

Lawren Stewart Harris's artistic career began in the first decade of our century. Well known for the nationalist-inspired landscapes that he painted between 1908 and 1932, Harris turned resolutely in 1934 to the painting of abstractions. He continued to create works that reflected his own modernist and mystical developments until the end of his life. Canadians praise Harris's landscapes and admire him as a planner of innovative and heroic-sounding sketching trips into the North. He is also recognized as the chief organizer of the Group of Seven. A long list of younger artists he considered creative grealy benefited from Harris's encouragement and often generous, practical help; many of them have been interviewed for this book. In the lives of some Canadians harris still functions as a gurulike guilde -- a role he was quite content to take on during his own lifetime -- because of the spiritual content of his art and aeathetic writings and the example of his optimistic, vigorous and apparently untroubled life. But Harris's was not an untroubled life, and Light for a Cold Land examines his personal crises and difficulties, some of which caused important changes in his art. The book also uncovers the painting styles, artistic tensions and cultural dynamics of the German milieu in which Harris received his only formal art education. His student years in Berlin profoundly influenced not only his art but also his artistic politics and his philosophy. It is ironic that in the art of this most articulate of Canadian nationalist painters, there are extensive German influences. Light for a Cold Land is the first art-historical study of Laren harris that attempts to explore his life and all aspects of his career. It is based on extensive work in archives, libraries, public art galleries and private collections in Canada, as well as research in Germany and interviews with mambers of Harris's family and many of his friends, acquaintances, coleagues and critics.
Canada

The Economic Development of the British Overseas Empire

Author: L. C. A. Knowles

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Canada

Page: 648

View: 670

First published by George Routledge & Sons Ltd. in 1924, 1930 and 1936. When first published in 1924, Knowles' first volume on the economic history of the British Empire offered a ground-breaking comparative study, ranging from slavery to Factory Acts, from cold storage to ticks and mosquitoes, from rural cultures to plantation products, and from bush paths to railways. Following her untimely death in 1926, the manuscripts for her second and third volumes were completed and published by her husband, C.M. Knowles, in 1930 and 1936. Volume I deals with economic and development issues relating to the Empire as a whole and also specifically with India, Malaya, Nigeria, Kenya and Uganda, while Volume II focuses more closely on Canada. Volume III covers the economic history of Australasia and South Africa.
Fiction

Making Arrangements

Author: Robert Harlow

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 309

View: 275

Making Arrangements is narrated by the legless Emil Lime. From the vantage point of his wheelchair, he tells the story of a very exciting week in the lives of the denizens of the St Augustine Hotel, all of whom are horse players, the most ardent being Harry Watkins, the 59 year-old retired private eye who now does nightshift as the hotel detective, and his long-time friend, taxi-driver Basil Turner. The small half-mile bullring track where the horses run is called Granville Downs, whose owner (and the designated villain in Emil´s story) is Carson Noma, who has, laughably and long since, "warned Basil and Harry off the heath". Basil was once a trainer of race horses, who had, on occasion, used dope to ensure that one of his horses might win, and Harry has sometimes supported his betting habit by touting. The story begins when Brucie, who is new at the hooker business, and who is accused, correctly, of not being a true professional, is dropped out of the hotel´s second floor window. Ernie, the night clerk, sees her dangling naked from her waist on down from the marquee over the St Augustine´s entrance. He is panicked, afraid the police might arrive and cause trouble, but the situation is saved by Harry and Basil, and by Veg Crawford, an assistant starter at Granville Downs. The four of them huddle around Brucie to hide her nakedness and get her upstairs to the room where she has been servicing (not very well) Sid Noma, Carson´s 27 year-old son, whose demands were beyond her. She is not a pro but what she calls a "fem sool" named Darlene Henderson, who has lost her children to a monster husband and is trying secretly to become a working girl to pay for a divorce and get custody of her kids. Thus begins, quietly, the love story between her and Veg, a story that comes to its conclusion during the novel´s denouement The Brucie-Darlene and Sid Noma problem resolved, Basil announces the news that will take up his and Harry´s full time for the next week. The first item is that Ivan Mulkov (an owner of apartments, corner groceries and a funeral home) claimed Shifty Sands out of the eighth race on Saturday, and being a real bargain hunter has told Basil that if he can get his trainer´s license back he can train the horse. The second item is that a Middle-Easterner named Mittani is bringing in a horse named Constantinople to challenge Carson Noma´s fine chestnut gelding Transcanada in the inaugural running of the Aurora Borealis Maturity for four-year-old fillies and geldings, a new handicap Noma has created in order to showcase his horse. The Mulkov-Shifty Sands story is part of the undercard to the main event, which is to get a lot of money together and put it down on Constantinople, a horse they think can win against Transcanada. If God is in the details (served up by Emil Lime from his wheelchair), the serious fun is in the complexities that follow. Basil does not get his license renewed. But during an unsuccessful hunt for Mittani, thought to be staying in a downtown rooming house, to try to get some inside information on Constantinople, Basil finds a note under the wiper on his taxi´s windshield that is obviously a kidnap note, but it makes no demand except that Harvey Benton should "be released from his place of incarceration." It is signed by John Morgan, president of ARQ, a large corporate corporate conglomerate, whose disappearance is making headlines. They try to sell the note to a sportswriter on a local paper, but the reporter calls the cops and Harry and Basil are nearly killed while escaping. They go to Emil´s apartment to hide out, decide to get rid of the note (Emil leaves it in the cop car outside a bookmaker´s while the cops are inside placing their bets). Later, when Basil and Harry and Emil go out to Cleo´s farm to pick up Shifty Sands, Harry and Cleo (admirers of each other and occasional lovers) disappear for a little
History

The Intellectual in Modern Chinese History

Author: Timothy Cheek

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 559

This vivid narrative history of Chinese intellectuals and public life provides a guide to making sense of China today. Timothy Cheek presents a map and a method for understanding the intellectual in the long twentieth century, from China's defeat in the Sino-Japanese war in 1895 to the 'Prosperous China' since the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Cheek surveys the changing terrain of intellectual life over this transformative century in Chinese history to enable readers to understand a particular figure, idea or debate. The map provides coordinates to track different times, different social worlds and key concepts. The historical method focuses on context and communities during six periods to make sense of ideas, institutions and individual thinkers across the century. Together they provide a memorable account of the scenes and protagonists, and arguments and ideas, of intellectuals and public life in modern China.
Cooking

The BC Wine Lover's Cookbook

Author: Jennifer Schell

Publisher: Appetite by Random House

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 272

View: 965

NATIONAL BESTSELLER Discover the vineyards, valleys, islands, deserts--and kitchens--of BC's Wine Country in this collection of recipes, tour ideas, menus and more. Take a tour through beautiful British Columbia with award-winning cookbook author and winemaker Jennifer Schell. The BC Wine Lover's Cookbook shares family stories and recipes from 53 top wineries located across the province--from the verdant, rolling fields of the Okanagan and Fraser Valley, to the misty coastlines of Vancouver Island, and beyond. Meet the winemakers of BC wine country and take a seat at their table to share dishes that evoke the multicultural heritage of BC's wine industry. From tourtière to turkey moussaka and Michelle's Panna Cotta to Nana's Roast Caribou, these recipes have been lovingly handed down through the generations--on handwritten recipe cards, on creased and spattered pages, sometimes by word of mouth. And don't forget the wine! Each recipe is accompanied by a pairing suggestion from the winery's cellars. Whether you are perched on Naramata Bench or tucked up at home, this is a cookbook to read and to inspire.
Cooking

Tasting Pleasure

Author: Jancis Robinson

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 352

View: 112

Even the French admit that Jancis Robinson is the "undisputed mistress of the kingdom of wine" (Le Figaro). Internationally renowned for her work in both television and print, she is the editor of the bestselling Oxford Companion to Wine and has won more than two dozen major awards around the world. Tasting Pleasure is her compelling account of a passion that began while studying at Oxford University.Writing with Julia Child's authority, Elizabeth David's intelligence, and M.F.K. Fisher's verve, Robinson takes us on a journey through the world's finest cellars, most beautiful vineyards, and best restaurants. As she explores the universe of the grape--from Bordeaux to Australia and South Africa to California--we meet scores of colorful, wine-loving characters, including Philippe de Rothschild, Julian Barnes, Francis Ford Coppola, and Julio Gallo.There are many books about producing and rating wine; this one is about enjoying it. Witty, revealing, and knowledgeable, in Tasting Pleasure Jancis Robinson has distilled twenty years in the wine world into a hugely entertaining read.
Self-Help

A Pace of Grace

Author: Linda Kavelin Popov

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 352

View: 963

In today’s anxiety-ridden, stress-infused world, even a moment of quiet reflection has become a time- consuming luxury most of us just can’t afford. How did we reach this point? How did we lose our direction and sense of control? And, most important, how can we reclaim our lives? Linda Kavelin Popov asked herself these same questions, after the pressures of her own workaholic lifestyle nearly destroyed her. Now, as cofounder of the International Virtues Project she helps others achieve a pace of grace—a pace for our lives that can balance and sustain us physically and spiritually. Through a four-part program that teaches you how to purify your life, pace yourself, practice the presence, and plan a sustainable life, A Pace of Grace offers simple ways to rediscover the essential elements of a life well lived. Complete with Linda’s ten rules for health, this comprehensive guide is the first step in recapturing the joy and vibrancy inherent in each of us.